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Educating
Publishing knowledge, disseminating truth. Photo © Viorika Prikhodko

Education — inspiring societal change

“Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.”
(Nelson Mandela, South African President and Nobel Peace Prize Winner, born 1918)

This webpage contains publications which seek to promote poverty reduction, climate justice, environmental sustainability and organisational learning. Global poverty and climate change are likely among the biggest challenges now confronting (and conflicting) humanity. An educated public appears instrumental if a peaceful transition to a sustainable and equitable low-carbon global society is to succeed. Featured books, research reports, book chapters, and journal articles seek to make a contribution.

The power of education has been known for millennia. More than 2,300 years ago the Greek philosopher Aristotle (384-322 BC), student of Plato and one of the most influential teachers of all times, identified education as the kingpin of societal transformation: “All who have meditated on the art of governing mankind have been convinced that the fate of empires depends on the education of youth.” Centuries later German-born Physicist and Nobel Prize Winner Albert Einstein (1879-1955) stressed the duty to publish truth: “By academic freedom I understand the right to search for truth and to publish and teach what one holds to be true. This right also implies a duty: one must not conceal any part of what one has recognized to be true. It is evident that any restriction of academic freedom acts in such a way as to hamper the dissemination of knowledge among the people and thereby impedes national judgment and action.”

PhD Research @ UNSW


Planet Prepare

Doctoral Dissertation: Luetz, J M (2013) Climate Migration: Preparedness Informed Policy Opportunities Identified During Field Research in Bolivia, Bangladesh and Maldives. A thesis in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). Thesis: 388 pp; Appendix: 112 pp. Submitted to the University of New South Wales (UNSW) on 28 March 2013. Degree conferred 10 October 2013. Graduated 7 November 2013.

Ph.D. Thesis Abstract: High levels of human mobility brought on by global megatrends such as population growth, urbanisation, globalisation, coastward migration, environmental degradation, resource depletion, and sprawling of slums in developing countries are likely to be reinforced by climate change, making it plausible that human mobility will increase significantly during the 21st Century. Within the academic, development and international community there is no uniform view how this potentiality should be faced, but projections typically agree that the majority of this migration can be expected to occur in developing countries characterised by high levels of poverty and vulnerability. Moreover, it can be observed that a significant amount of climate change related migration is already underway. A review of the literature reveals knowledge gaps with respect to both interdisciplinary and local-level research that expressly invites the perspectives of climate migrants. This dissertation responds to these gaps both by drawing on literature in several fields of inquiry, and by intentionally engaging with migration-affected populations to identify what preferred solutions they envisage. Taking a humanitarian preparedness approach, this research seeks to identify what migrants want so that appropriate policy instruments for equitable macro-managed migration processes can be discussed, developed, drafted and legislated well before they are needed. To this end, this research aims to learn from various forms of current migrations, which may or may not all be climate induced. At its simplest, this thesis argues that policy preparedness is the a priori policy posture of choice. Drawing on fieldwork conducted in Bolivia, Bangladesh and the Maldives, this research repositions climate migrants at the centre of a scholarly debate that has largely marginalised or even patronised them. It concludes: (1) inviting the contributions of migrants leads to preferable migration outcomes; (2) policy maker foresight is an important success factor; (3) targeted service provision can enable more positive migration outcomes; (4) many migrants wish to stay in their countries/communities, thereby highlighting the importance of in situ adaptation; (5) nomenclature is a non-problem in the minds of most migrants; (6) accountable and responsive government institutions have a key role to play in enabling anticipatory migrations; (7) education is the sine qua non for all future migration preparedness.

Relevant Resources: download thesis (5.8 MB) from this website; download thesis from UNSW Library; download abstract (220 KB). A few Ph.D. documentaries have been published online with field research footage captured on site in Bolivia, Bangladesh and the Maldives. A short talk is available on communicating the essence of the Ph.D. research in simple language in the public domain.

Thesis @ UNSW

 

Publications: Books


Planet Prepare

Planet Prepare — Preparing Coastal Communities in Asia For Future Catastrophes (Asia Pacific Disaster Report 2008)

Lead Author, Research & Design: Johannes M Luetz
Editorial Board: Richard Rumsey, Laurence Gray, James East, Elaine Tan

Disaster Preparedness: The word “disaster” is derived from the Greek pejorative prefix “dis-” (bad) and “aster” (star). According to the Oxford Dictionary, the word’s root in astrology literally denotes an “ill-starred” event. For many centuries people believed that a catastrophic event resulted under a “bad star” – a dis-aster. But while natural disasters have occurred throughout history, today we know that they occur not as a result of a bad alignment of the stars, but when hazards and vulnerabilities combine. Recent decades have seen a steep increase in natural disasters across the world. While these events are largely unavoidable – and are projected to increase as a result of climate change – their impacts can be lessened through disaster “preparedness.” Incidentally, the verb “prepare” is derived from the Latin “prae” (before) and “parãre” (make ready). According to Chambers Dictionary of Etymology, to “prepare” literally means to “make ready beforehand.” The world needs to prepare for disasters before they occur, reducing risk, raising resilience and promoting preparedness. The future of our planet lies not in the stars. The future of our planet lies in our hands.

World Vision International (2nd ed.); Bangkok, Thailand (2008).
Download/s: executive summary (English, 550 KB), Zusammenfassung (German, 70 KB), press release (English, 65 KB), Pressemitteilung (German, 65 KB), press coverage (5.5 MB). ISBN 1-887983-47-3, 124 Pages, 8.1 MB

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Opportunities

Opportunities for Global Poverty Reduction in the 21st Century —
The Role of Policy Makers, Corporations, NGOs, and Individuals

Author: Johannes M Lütz
Contributing Authors: Eileen Baldry, Heidemarie Wieczorek-Zeul

Every hour of every day 1,200 children die from poverty-related causes. An afternoon may roughly be the time it takes to read through this book. Think about it – by the time you have finished reading this book, the world will be several thousand children “poorer.” In today’s globalized world, poverty is no longer beyond anyone’s reach but has been shown to reside right on our doorstep. Indeed, the world has “shrunk” into a global village. Imagine: What would the distribution of wealth look like if the world had only 1,000 inhabitants? 150 villagers would live in rich neighborhoods, 780 in poor districts. About 100 people would own 85% of the wealth, while roughly half the village would fight daily for raw survival, on less than $2 per day. And yet, the ocean of opportunity is awash with an abundance of assets: it teems with life. Opportunities for Global Poverty Reduction in the 21st Century heartily welcomes you to a motivating and hopeful tour of discovery...

WDL-Verlag (2nd Edition); Berlin, Germany (2007). Download/s: Table of Contents (2 pages, 30 KB), Reviewers' Preview (2 pages, 60 KB), Cover (2 pages, 1.2 MB),
front matter (pages i-iv, 100 KB). ISBN 978-3-86682-107-1
252 Pages (Hardcover). List Price: EUR 28.00

Available here
Bergpredigt nacherzählt

matchBOOKS — Bergpredigt nacherzählt
Das Minibuch aus der Streichholzschachtel

Autoren: Johannes Lütz, Tilman Hierath, Daniela Möller, Oliver Stolpe, Wei Wei Yap

Wenige Worte haben die Geschichte unseres Planeten so verändert wie die Bergpredigt des Jesus aus Nazareth. Es waren „zündende Gedanken“. Junge Leute von heute haben sie in eigenen Worten nacherzählt. Wir haben sie auf Mini-Format gedruckt und das hundertseitige Buch in eine Streichholzschachtel verpackt. Viele haben sich darüber gefreut: “Es ist wirklich eine gute Idee, solche ‘Matchbooks’ zu drucken. Ich habe schon mit Freude in dem kleinen Buch gelesen.” (Johannes Rau, Bundespräsident a.D.); “Dass junge Menschen sich daran machen, die Bergpredigt nachzuerzählen, ist in sich selbst ein Zeichen der Zuversicht.” (Richard von Weizsäcker, Bundespräsident a.D.). Weitere Echos und Infos zum Minibuch aus der Streichholzschachtel auf matchBOOKS.de .

WDL-Verlag Berlin, 2. durchges. Aufl. (2004)
ISBN 978-3-932356-80-3, 112 Seiten
Preis: EUR 5,00 (Einzelexemplar)

Erhältlich hier


Book Chapters


Gutes Predigen

GUTES PREDIGEN: 21 Predigten für das 21. Jahrhundert —
Mit je einer Anleitung, Gutes gut zu predigen

Eine Predigtwerkstatt mit Beiträgen von W. Bergemann, A. Giebel, N. Giebel, K. Jägemann, D. Lütz (Hg.), J. Lütz, H. Mallau, M. Noss, G. Piel, O. Pilnei, A. Riemenschneider, E. Rockel, J. Rosemann, I. Stanullo, A. Strübind, K. Strübind, J. Swoboda, V. Tepp, H. Wahl, K. Wlodarek, C. Wolf.

GUTES PREDIGEN hat auch heute Seltenheitswert. Das zu ändern, ist erklärtes Ziel des vorliegenden Predigtbandes. Der Titel dieses Buches ist absichtlich doppeldeutig formuliert. GUTES PREDIGEN kann ja einmal den Inhalt bezeichnen, dann geht es darum, GUTES zu predigen. Es kann aber auch für die Kunst stehen, gut zu PREDIGEN. Vielfältig sind auch die Predigenden selbst: Mit 85 Jahren sind die ältesten fast dreimal so alt und reich an Erfahrung wie die jüngsten mit 30. Aber eins verbindet sie alle: die Leidenschaft zu predigen.

WDL-Verlag Berlin, 2. durchges. Aufl. (2005)
ISBN 978-3-932356-78-0, 256 Seiten
Preis: EUR 15,00 (FBTh Bd. 11)

Erhältlich hier


Research Reports, Journal Articles


Sorprendido por la sorpresa

Sorprendido por la sorpresa: Investigación realizada en las comunidades guaraníes del Chaco boliviano desplazadas por la sequía

Autores: Johannes M Luetz y Wendy Barrón Pinto

En los últimos años el concepto de “estado de preparación” (preparedness en inglés) ganó adeptos en los círculos humanitarios y de gestión de desastres. Pero, ¿podría surgir también como un marco conceptual útil en situaciones donde las personas luchan para enfrentar la migración forzada a causa del cambio climático? El artículo presenta la investigación realizada en las comunidades guaraníes del Chaco boliviano desplazadas por la sequía, y demuestra que los jóvenes emigrantes rurales que se dirigían a las ciudades escapaban de un desastre pero se enfrentaban a otros problemas; en estas situaciones, el concepto humanitario de “preparación” puede garantizar procesos y resultados más equitativos.

Revista de la Fundación Global Democracia y Desarrollo (FUNGLODE)
Vol 9. No 46. (Mayo/Junio 2012)
Páginas 46-53, 2.2 MB

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Se Busca Liderazgo

Se Busca Liderazgo
Cambio Climático post-Copenhague 2009

Autor: Johannes M Luetz

Escribir sobre el cambio climático post-Copenhague 2009 ya no puede hacerse principalmente sobre la ciencia del clima, sino en la base del liderazgo. La inmensa montaña de evidencia científica revisada por expertos que ha sido acumulada en las dos últimas décadas, ha puesto a la humanidad a tomar medidas sólidas sobre el cambio climático y traducir el consenso científico en acciones políticas decisivas y en reformas sociales amplias. Ya que los sistemas, las estructuras los mercados conspiran para mantener el statu quo y evitar el cambio, es necesario un liderazgo sin precedentes para evitar la que probablemente sea la amenaza más grave a la que jamás se haya enfrentado la humanidad. Este artículo expone el caso científico para llevar adelante una acción vanguardista sobre este fenómeno ambiental y discute por qué un liderazgo valiente es el último rayo de esperanza del mundo en la hora final.

Revista de la Fundación Global Democracia y Desarrollo (FUNGLODE)
Vol 6. No 33. (Marzo/Abril 2010). [Text in English: 9 pages, 1.9 MB]
Páginas 46-53, 3.1 MB

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Wanted!

Wanted: Leadership
Climate Change Leadership post-Copenhagen 2009

Author: Johannes M Luetz

Writing about climate change post-Copenhagen 2009 can no longer be mainly about climate science. Writing about climate change post-Copenhagen 2009 can only be about leadership. The huge mountain of peer-reviewed scientific evidence amassed in the last two decades has charged humanity to take robust action on climate change, and to translate the scientific conclusions into decisive political action and comprehensive societal reform. Since systems, structures and markets conspire to maintain the status quo and prevent change, unprecedented leadership is needed to stave off what is likely the gravest threat ever to have faced humanity. This article lays out the scientific case for avant-garde action on climate change and discusses why lion-hearted leadership could be the world’s last glimmer of hope at the eleventh hour.

Revista de la Fundación Global Democracia y Desarrollo (FUNGLODE)
Published in Spanish: Vol 6. No 33. Marzo/Abril 2010 (Páginas 46-53, 3.1 MB)
Aailable in English: 9 Pages, 1.9 MB

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Threats to health

Climate Change Threats to Health
Climate Change Series (Part 3) — The Vulnerability of Children

Lead Author: Gerard Finnigan
Series Editor, Producer: Johannes M Luetz

In this series of publications World Vision seeks to identify concrete responses to climate change both at the programming and policy levels.

Over recent years climate change has emerged as a new driver of malnutrition. In the wake of the 2008 food crisis, the number of children with this life-threatening condition escalated, increasing mortality rates by 5-20 times. The climate emergency is poised to exacerbate children’s risk to physical injury, malnutrition and infection. For decades World Vision has worked with developing communities to help them carry an already heavy health burden from malnutrition, diarrhoea and vector-borne diseases. With climate change threatening to unravel decades of development, efforts to curb existing vulnerabilities and mainstream child-focused adaptation into development programming must be urgently stepped up. Ultimately the success of humanity adapting to a continually changing environment will be intrinsically tied to protecting the health and well-being of children. This publication explores ways and means.

Melbourne, World Vision Australia (2009)
ISBN 978-0-9807094-6-9
36 Pages, 8.9 MB

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Reduce Risk

Reduce Risk and Raise Resilience
Climate Change Series (Part 2) — Disaster Risk Reduction

Lead Author: David Lansley; Co-Author: Kirsten Donaldson
Series Editor, Producer: Johannes M Luetz

In this series of publications World Vision seeks to identify concrete responses to climate change both at the programming and policy levels.

Around the globe World Vision is witnessing first hand the devastating impact of climate change on poor communities. Governments, non-governmental organisations and communities are grappling to adapt to new threats and their impacts. We have much to learn. Over recent decades the number and severity of disasters has risen steadily. While the disaster events themselves cannot always be prevented, their risk can be significantly reduced through preparedness. This publication explores why a warming world makes disaster risk reduction and increased resilience more and more indispensable. The rationale is straightforward. Disasters can wipe out years of development gains overnight. This happened in 2008 when in one night Cyclone Nargis wreaked havoc. With a death toll of more than 140,000 people, Cyclone Nargis entered the history books as one of the deadliest cyclones of all times. Reducing disaster risk lies at the heart of sustainable development.

Melbourne, World Vision Australia (2009)
ISBN 978-0-9807094-5-2
32 Pages, 6.3 MB

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Parching Planet

Poverty and a Parching Planet
Climate Change Series (Part 1) — Food and Water Security

Lead Author: David Lansley; Co-Author: Kirsten Donaldson
Series Editor, Producer: Johannes M Luetz

In this series of publications World Vision seeks to identify concrete responses to climate change both at the programming and policy levels.

Over recent decades water scarcity has become more frequent, and scientists are observing a process of increased parching. Climate change is the dominant driver. The challenges to food and water security in the 21st century are unprecedented. The United Nations Development Programme estimates that unchecked, by 2080 climate change may increase the number of malnourished people by 600 million and increase the number of people facing water scarcity by 1.8 billion. Combine these forecasts with current trends in precipitation patterns, population growth, urbanisation, higher per capita calorie intake, and increasing meat consumption, and it is a recipe for disaster, with enormous potential for conflicts over water resources. With more than half a century of experience working in many of the most food and water insecure countries, World Vision is committed to helping the poorest adapt to a drier and potentially dire future. This publication explores ways and means.

Melbourne, World Vision Australia (2009)
ISBN 978-0-9807094-4-5
48 Pages, 8.7 MB

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Myanmar

Myanmar —
Disaster Monitor Fact Sheet (5)

Lead Author: Johannes M Luetz
Concept & Production: Johannes M Luetz

This series of research fact sheets commissioned by World Vision Asia Pacific warns of the vulnerability of developing communities in the face of climate change. Over recent decades, the number and severity of natural disasters has risen steadily. While scientists worldwide ponder the causes of rising sea levels and increased disaster activity, World Vision’s fact sheets aim to help Asia and the Pacific prepare for the effects. Looking at countries in the context of natural catastrophes positions World Vision to better predict, prevent or prepare for the onslaught of disasters. The rationale is simple: disasters can wipe out years of development in mere minutes. Reducing disaster risk is not an optional extra – but an extra obligation. It is at the heart of sustainable development. This series aims to position the Asia Pacific for heightened disaster preparedness.

World Vision Asia Pacific Regional Office
Bangkok, Thailand (2008)
8 Pages, 2.6 MB

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Philippines

Philippines —
Disaster Monitor Fact Sheet (4)

Lead Author: Johannes M Luetz
Concept & Production: Johannes M Luetz

This series of research fact sheets commissioned by World Vision Asia Pacific warns of the vulnerability of developing communities in the face of climate change. Over recent decades, the number and severity of natural disasters has risen steadily. While scientists worldwide ponder the causes of rising sea levels and increased disaster activity, World Vision’s fact sheets aim to help Asia and the Pacific prepare for the effects. Looking at countries in the context of natural catastrophes positions World Vision to better predict, prevent or prepare for the onslaught of disasters. The rationale is simple: disasters can wipe out years of development in mere minutes. Reducing disaster risk is not an optional extra – but an extra obligation. It is at the heart of sustainable development. This series aims to position the Asia Pacific for heightened disaster preparedness.

World Vision Asia Pacific Regional Office
Bangkok, Thailand (2008)
8 Pages, 2.2 MB

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Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea —
Disaster Monitor Fact Sheet (3)

Lead Author: Johannes M Luetz
Concept & Production: Johannes M Luetz

This series of research fact sheets commissioned by World Vision Asia Pacific warns of the vulnerability of developing communities in the face of climate change. Over recent decades, the number and severity of natural disasters has risen steadily. While scientists worldwide ponder the causes of rising sea levels and increased disaster activity, World Vision’s fact sheets aim to help Asia and the Pacific prepare for the effects. Looking at countries in the context of natural catastrophes positions World Vision to better predict, prevent or prepare for the onslaught of disasters. The rationale is simple: disasters can wipe out years of development in mere minutes. Reducing disaster risk is not an optional extra – but an extra obligation. It is at the heart of sustainable development. This series aims to position the Asia Pacific for heightened disaster preparedness.

World Vision Asia Pacific Regional Office
Bangkok, Thailand (2008)
8 Pages, 2.4 MB

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Indonesia

Indonesia —
Disaster Monitor Fact Sheet (2)

Lead Author: Johannes M Luetz
Concept & Production: Johannes M Luetz

This series of research fact sheets commissioned by World Vision Asia Pacific warns of the vulnerability of developing communities in the face of climate change. Over recent decades, the number and severity of natural disasters has risen steadily. While scientists worldwide ponder the causes of rising sea levels and increased disaster activity, World Vision’s fact sheets aim to help Asia and the Pacific prepare for the effects. Looking at countries in the context of natural catastrophes positions World Vision to better predict, prevent or prepare for the onslaught of disasters. The rationale is simple: disasters can wipe out years of development in mere minutes. Reducing disaster risk is not an optional extra – but an extra obligation. It is at the heart of sustainable development. This series aims to position the Asia Pacific for heightened disaster preparedness.

World Vision Asia Pacific Regional Office
Bangkok, Thailand (2008)
8 Pages, 2.4 MB

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Bangla Desh

Bangladesh —
Disaster Monitor Fact Sheet (1)

Lead Author: Johannes M Luetz
Concept & Production: Johannes M Luetz

This series of research fact sheets commissioned by World Vision Asia Pacific warns of the vulnerability of developing communities in the face of climate change. Over recent decades, the number and severity of natural disasters has risen steadily. While scientists worldwide ponder the causes of rising sea levels and increased disaster activity, World Vision’s fact sheets aim to help Asia and the Pacific prepare for the effects. Looking at countries in the context of natural catastrophes positions World Vision to better predict, prevent or prepare for the onslaught of disasters. The rationale is simple: disasters can wipe out years of development in mere minutes. Reducing disaster risk is not an optional extra – but an extra obligation. It is at the heart of sustainable development. This series aims to position the Asia Pacific for heightened disaster preparedness.

World Vision Asia Pacific Regional Office
Bangkok, Thailand (2008)
8 Pages, 2.1 MB

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Research Proposals


PhD Proposal

PhD Proposal: Sea Level Refugees — Opportunities And Success Factors For Controlled Climate Change Migration — Lessons From Present-Day Small Island Resettlements

PhD Candidate Johannes M Luetz

Research suggests that the world could be teetering on the brink of an era of large-scale climate change migration. While civilisations have previously abandoned some locations in favour of others on account of climatic changes and related resource constraints, the order of magnitude on which climate change may create environmental migrants in the 21st century is unprecedented. Quantitative research estimates vary but hold one similarity in common: the prognoses range in the millions of people. Left unchecked and unmanaged, such massive-scale movements of climate migrants within, and across, international borders, could destabilise nations internally, create tensions within the international community and – in the absence of political forethought and management – become a formula for protracted, bloody conflicts and human misery. This PhD research seeks to raise policy options for anticipatory rather than reactionary migration management so that appropriate policy mechanisms can be discussed, developed, drafted and legislated well before they are needed.

Berlin, Germany (2009)
Text version, draft
8 Pages, 130 KB

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PhD Proposal

PhD Proposal: Sea Level Refugees — Opportunities And Success Factors For Controlled Climate Change Migration — Lessons From Present-Day Small Island Resettlements

PhD Candidate Johannes M Luetz

This PhD research is a follow-on study to a year of desk and field research on climate change preparedness carried out for the humanitarian INGO World Vision. The published report Planet Prepare: Preparing Coastal Communities in Asia For Future Catastrophes (124 Pages, 8.1 MB) calls on policy makers, development organisations and donor governments to take a more proactive stance in dealing with the growing vulnerabilities of developing countries in the face of climate change. The initial study saw hundreds of islanders and coast dwellers interviewed, and a number of interviews are featured in the report. These eyewitness accounts from across the Asia Pacific suggest that climate change migration has already become a present-day reality for numerous developing communities. More research is needed. By engaging with affected communities at grassroots level this qualitative and quantitative PhD study seeks to raise policy options which may lead to more equitable migration management processes and outcomes.

Berlin, Germany (2009)
Picture version, draft
12 Pages, 1.7 MB

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PhD Project
Sponsors:
UNSW     IES    World Vision
© Johannes M Luetz  •  Mobile: +61 (0)4-1215-5736 (Australia)  •  E-Mail: contact@luetz.com